Try Our Wraps Made With Ora King Salmon

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What's it about

We use Ora King salmon from sustainable aquaculture fisheries in New Zealand. Known for their quality and mild buttery flavored salmon, they delivered as advertised. To highlight the salmon, we visit our inner sushi chef and combine this with some sushi rice, avocado, Asian pear, lomi tomato, daikon sprouts, pickled gobo root, baby arugula, smelt roe, spicy citrus mayo and furikake. Our kids went crazy over this to the extent that I heard the comment, "I think I died and went to heaven".

Salmon Wraps – Awesome Flavor, Healthy, Sustainable Seafood

Salmon wraps are a creative addition to your daily eating rotation. You don’t have to make it a new year’s resolution, but rather a long term dedication to creating tasty recipes that are good for you. That sounds so much better, strong dedication, zero commitment.


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It first started the other day when I was thinking about how much I love Vietnamese summer rolls with pork, shrimp, fresh herbs and the peanut dipping sauce. So I’m online and I come across a local place called World Wraps. (Warning: Never go on a food search or grocery shopping for that matter when you are already hungry.) Anyway, I had to check this place out. It was a really cool variety that represents many popular cuisines and flavors from an International perspective. I think I over ordered because I wanted to try everything on the menu. See warning. I will definitely be back, but this food excursion inspired me to want to make my own version at home. Perfect timing because I was expecting my first subscription delivery from Crowd Cow.

HEALTHY WRAPS

Wraps are really easy to make and the kids will appreciate the variety at lunchtime. It is a simple as taking the ingredients that could be in any type of dish or salad and rolling it in thin soy paper or your preferential wrap for convenience. The ingredients on the inside can relate to a specific cuisine of your choice. Depending on what type of flavors you like, the sky’s the limit. I was already thinking about Indian cuisine for my next wrap because I love tandoori chicken. The harmony with a creamy yogurt sauce and fresh crispy vegetables blows my mind. There are a number of different types of wraps depending on your taste and diet.

Tortilla Wraps

These are the most common which everyone already knows about. The wraps used for burritos with different types like spinach, sun dried tomato, whole wheat and gluten-free. One of my favorite lunches was the California Club in a spinach wrap. I would make this with mayonnaise, avocado, sliced tomato, red leaf lettuce, smoked turkey, bacon and Swiss cheese. Add some Sun Chips and lunch was something to look forward to.

Coconut Wraps

I have seen these in some cool flavors like turmeric, cinnamon and moringa. According to the packaging these low calorie vegan wraps are Non-GMO, gluten-free, Paleo friendly and organic. You can get these online from IHerb.

Soy Paper

These are my favorite because they are light weight enough so they don’t compete with the flavor of the ingredients. There is very little texture, but they are sort of delicate. This means avoid excess moisture and use a sharp knife to cut. They are vegetarian, gluten-free and contain no preservatives. The variety packs come in different colors made from turmeric extract, paprika extract, spinach extract and soybean oil. Some of the sheets already have black and white sesame seeds embedded. These can be purchased from Japanese markets like Marukai or Mitsuwa or from online suppliers.

top view of assorted soy wraps

Rice Paper

Rice paper is another favorite that can be matched with both raw and cooked ingredients. Common in SouthEast Asian cuisine, they hold up well even with a wet dipping sauce. The only drawback is that they need to be kept moist or the skin will start to dry out. If left in the refrigerator too long the texture becomes hard and they are not the same after that.

SALMON WRAPS

All the fillings for this recipe can be prepared ahead of time and refrigerated. Shelf life for these ingredients is about five days.

top front view of pickled gobo root cut into matchsticks
Pickled Gobo Root

Just to clarify that one full sheet of soy paper wrapped salmon is a serving for one person or two half sheets. Typically I would purchase the full sheets, but recently I could only find the half sheets. I’m making enough for 4 people so that equals 8 half sheets (2 per person). I later discovered that this wasn’t enough. A very popular fan favorite requires double next time.

top view of asian pear cut into matchsticks
Asian Pear

*Tips: When purchasing salmon to consume that is not fully cooked or eaten as sashimi stick to either Japanese markets or reputable online suppliers. One indicator of freshness in pre-fabricated salmon is smell. Another indicator is appearance. If it doesn’t look good, it probably isn’t. Avoid salmon from regions where the fisheries have a bad reputation. To avoid the issue of parasites, very lightly sprinkle some salt over the salmon and let it sit for 10 minutes. Double wrap tightly in plastic wrap and freeze for 72 hours. Salmon is a very durable protein and once defrosted it will be the exactly the same prior to freezing.

PREPARING THE RICE

top front view of steamed white rice with sushi vinegar in a glass bowl atop a wooden board

Place the hot rice in a mixing bowl or container. Sushi bars sometimes use plastic or bamboo mixing containers for sushi rice. Drizzle the vinegar over the rice paddle to evenly distribute.

Gently cut the rice to break up any clumps and fold together with the vinegar. Turn the rice over a few times and repeat the process of breaking up any clumps. Spread the rice out flat and let it cool for 8 minutes. While the rice is still warm, cover with a damp cloth.

SPICY CITRUS MAYO

I was planning on using a ponzu sauce to dip the wraps in and I have avocado as a filling. But, I really wanted to add a little bit more of something to add another layer of acid, spice and fat. It is the same reasoning behind a spicy sour cream with a burrito or aioli with your ham and cheese sandwich. I highly recommend using Japanese kewpie mayonnaise because it is extra creamy with a smoother taste. Any mayonnaise will work or you could eliminate this ingredient altogether. I decided on using mayonnaise with sriracha chili sauce, pure yuzu juice and homemade ponzu.

misc en place for spicy citrus mayo

In a small bowl whisk together mayonnaise, ponzu, yuzu and sriracha till smooth. If it is too wet, adjust by adding a little more mayonnaise. Refrigerate until ready to use. By the way, this is also a great dip for blanched asparagus and steamed artichokes.

top front view of spicy citrus aioli in a glass bowl

LOMI TOMATO

Combine all ingredients and mix well. You can substitute cherry or pear tomatoes depending on your preference. This is very similar to pico de gallo except that in Hawaii they use Hawaiian white or red alaea sea salt. The term lomi lomi means to “massage”. One of my favorite suppliers for sea salt is Hawaii Kai Corporation. They are very good people and they produce a quality product harvested from the shores of Molokai. I will also be adding a recipe for lomi lomi salmon in an upcoming post. Basically, lomi tomato plus fresh salted salmon. This is a typical dish that is served at luaus or traditional Hawaiian feasts in the Aloha State.

top view of loom tomato in a glass bowl

ORA KING SALMON

The salmon arrived as a full side with the skin-on and pin bones removed. This is the actual natural color of the salmon meat. The bright orange that we are accustomed to seeing is a result of specialized feed in the farmed fisheries. The result is a bright vibrant orange color that is visually appealing to consumers.

top front view of uncooked Ora King salmon filet

The Toro of Salmon

This salmon reminds me of bluefin toro which is the best cut of fish in the sashimi world. Toro is the belly portion of the largest apex predator in the tuna family known as “fatty tuna”. It is more of a dull red/pinkish to almost white color as opposed to the more common bright red akami tuna sashimi. These Ora King salmon loins are sashimi grade and they have been pre-frozen so they don’t need to be frozen again.

*Tasting Notes: We were very pleased overall with the quality and flavor of Ora King salmon (A+). The only complaint that I have was it not scaled. We believe in minimizing waste and we love crispy salmon skin. It is also very healthy because of the oils in the skin portion. It wasn’t that hard to remove the scales, but normally fish are scaled whole and this was a filleted portion.

Salmon Preparation

I did not plan on using a whole side of fish at one time. So, I used a very sharp knife removing a strip of the belly portion first then cutting 6-8 ounce filets. These I double wrapped and stuck back into the freezer. The greatest thing about fresh salmon is that it holds up to freezing without losing color, texture or nutrients. For this one filet that I planned to use, I removed the salmon skin first which I am freezing and saving for later.

*CrossEat Tips: Cooked salmon skin is edible with the same nutritious qualities of salmon meat. It should be cooked till crispy. It can be eaten with the salmon or used as a component in salads or sushi. If you don’t care for it, feed it to your furry companion as part of their meal or a treat. It is healthy for dogs (unless they are allergic to seafood) and they will love you for it.

**Tasting Notes: We demonstrate two different methods for the salmon. One of the methods was baking the salmon with a teriyaki glaze till it was fully cooked. The second method was a light sear in extra virgin olive oil that provides textural contrast, but the salmon is still rare.

SALMON METHOD I

Preheat oven to 350F. Place the portioned salmon (see recipe) on foil and brush with teriyaki sauce. You could also use yakitori sauce as a glaze. Place salmon in the oven and cook for 5 minutes. Turn the salmon over and cook for another 5 minutes. Remove and set aside.

SALMON METHOD II

Heat a small sauté over medium high heat. Once the pan is hot add the olive oil. Have a heat proof spatula or small tongs ready. Add the portioned salmon (see recipe) and very lightly sear on all sides. Remove immediately and set aside.

Pictured below are all of our ingredients ready to wrap. Notice the cooked salmon that was glazed with teriyaki sauce and the seared salmon that is still raw on the inside.

misc en place for making salmon wraps

FINISHING THE WRAP

STEP 1

Place the soy paper on a dry cutting board. It is important to keep the soy paper as dry as possible. Cover with an even layer of rice about 1/4″ thick. Leave at least 1-1/2″ of space at the top. Smush a few pieces of rice at the top so the wrap will stick together, almost like glue.

STEP 2

Place ingredients evenly down the center of the rice starting with furikake, masago and lomi tomato. (The ingredients listed are for an even distribution for the 4 full servings or 8 half servings.)

STEP 3

Next, add daikon sprouts, Asian pear and pickled gobo root.

STEP 4

Add arugula, avocado and spicy citrus mayo.

STEP 5

Last place your salmon atop the arugula. For the seared salmon I added a squeeze of lemon juice to give it some acid.

Starting with the bottom, roll upwards keeping the ingredients tightly packed in the center.

We served this with homemade ponzu and the taste was just awesomely good…and healthy too! Ultimately, you can add or substitute any ingredients that you prefer. Some of the factors to consider are flavor, sweet, fat, acid and texture.

Thank you for reading about our post on healthy delicious Salmon Wraps. Please leave a comment if you tried this recipe. Enjoy!

front view of salmon wraps with assorted soy paper

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Yield: 4 SERVINGS

Tasty Salmon Wraps

Tasty Salmon Wraps

This recipe highlights great quality salmon. We use Ora King salmon from sustainable aquaculture fisheries in New Zealand. The flavor is just clean and almost buttery. Then we visit our inner sushi chef and combine this with some sushi rice, avocado, Asian pear, lomi tomato, daikon sprouts, pickled gobo root, baby arugula, smelt roe, spicy citrus mayo and furikake. Our kids went crazy over this to the extent that I heard the comment, "I think I died and went to heaven".

Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 8 minutes
Total Time 38 minutes

Ingredients

  • 8 half sheets or 4 full sheets soy paper
  • 1-1/2 pounds fresh salmon, cut into 8 - 3 ounce block portions
  • 1 avocado, sliced
  • 1 package daikon (kaiware) sprouts (about 2.5 ounces)
  • 1/3 cup lomi tomato (see recipe below)
  • 1/4 cup spicy citrus mayo (see recipe below)
  • 1/2 cup pickled gobo root, julienne
  • 1/2 cup Asian pear, julienne
  • 1 cup baby arugula
  • 2 tablespoons furikake
  • 2 tablespoons smelt roe (masago)
  • 2 cups white rice, steamed
  • 1/2 cup seasoned rice wine vinegar

SPICY CITRUS MAYO

  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise (recommend Japanese Kewpie Mayo)
  • 1 tablespoon ponzu
  • 1/2 teaspoon yuzu juice (substitute lemon juice)
  • 1 teaspoon sriracha chili sauce

LOMI TOMATO

  • 1 medium red tomato, small diced
  • 1/4 cup yellow onion, small diced
  • 1 tablespoon green onions, thin sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon sea salt

SALMON METHOD I

  • 8 - 3 ounce portions salmon
  • 1/4 cup teriyaki sauce

SALMON METHOD II

  • 8 - 3 ounce portions of salmon
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

Instructions

All the fillings can be prepared ahead of time and refrigerated. Just to clarify that one full sheet of soy paper wrapped salmon is a serving for one person or two half sheets. Typically I would purchase the full sheets, but recently I could only find the half sheets.

PREPARING THE RICE

  1. Place the hot rice in a mixing bowl or container. Sushi bars sometimes use plastic or bamboo mixing containers for sushi rice. Drizzle the vinegar over the rice paddle to evenly distribute. Gently cut the rice to break up any clumps and fold together with the vinegar. Turn the rice over a few times and repeat the process of breaking up any clumps. Spread the rice out flat and let it cool for 8 minutes. While the rice is still warm, cover with a damp cloth.

SPICY CITRUS MAYO

  1. In a small bowl whisk together mayonnaise, ponzu, yuzu and sriracha till smooth. Refrigerate until ready to use.

LOMI TOMATO

  1. Combine all ingredients and mix well. You can substitute cherry or pear tomatoes depending on your preference.

SALMON METHOD I

  1. Preheat oven to 350F. Place the salmon on foil and brush with teriyaki sauce. Place in the oven and cook for 5 minutes. Turn the salmon over and cook for another 5 minutes. Remove and set aside.

SALMON METHOD II

  1. Heat a small sauté over medium high heat. Once the pan is hot add the olive oil. Have a heat proof spatula or small tongs ready. Add the salmon and very lightly sear on all sides. Remove immediately and set aside.

FINISHING THE WRAP

  1. Place the soy paper on a dry cutting board. It is important to keep the soy paper as dry as possible. Cover with an even layer of rice about 1/4" thick. Leave at least 1-1/2" of space at the top. Smush a few pieces of rice at the top so the wrap will stick together, almost like glue.
  2. Place ingredients evenly down the center of the rice starting with furikake, masago and lomi tomato. (The ingredients listed are for an even distribution for the 4 full servings or 8 half servings.)
  3. Next add daikon sprouts, Asian pear and pickled gobo root.
  4. Add arugula, avocado and spicy citrus mayo.
  5. Last place your salmon atop the arugula. For the seared salmon I added a squeeze of lemon juice to give it some acid.
  6. Starting with the bottom, roll upwards keeping the ingredients tightly packed in the center.
  7. We served this with homemade ponzu and the taste was just awesomely good...and healthy too!

Enjoy!

Notes

1. We demonstrate two different methods for the salmon. One of the methods was baking the salmon with a teriyaki glaze. The second method was a light sear in extra virgin olive oil that provides textural contrast, but the salmon is still rare.

2. When purchasing salmon to consume that is not fully cooked or eaten as sashimi stick to either Japanese markets or reputable online suppliers. One indicator of freshness in pre-fabricated salmon is smell. Another indicator is appearance. If it doesn't look good, it probably isn't. Avoid salmon from regions where the fisheries have a bad reputation. To avoid the issue of parasites, very lightly sprinkle some salt over the salmon and let it sit for 10 minutes. Double wrap tightly in plastic wrap and freeze for 72 hours. Salmon is a very durable protein and once defrosted it will be the exactly the same prior to freezing.

3. We were very pleased overall with the quality and flavor of Ora King salmon. The only complaint that I have was it not scaled. We believe in minimizing waste and we love crispy salmon skin. It is also very healthy because of the oils in the skin portion. It wasn't that hard to remove the scales by gently scraping with the blade of a sharp knife. However, fish are normally scaled whole and this was a filleted portion.

4. Consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish, or eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness, especially if you have certain medical conditions.

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